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The Safar Center for Resuscitation Research: Searching for Breakthroughs in the New Millennium

https://doi.org/10.15360/1813-9779-2006-6-15-25

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Аннотация

This review, written on the occasion of the 70 th anniversary of the Institute for General Reanimatology of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, provides an update of recent research in the field of resuscitation medicine carried out at the Safar Center for Resuscitation Research at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Current and recent studies describing bench to bedside investigation in the areas of traumatic brain injury (TBI), cardiopulmonary arrest, hemorrhagic shock, and ultranovel approaches to resuscitation are discussed. Investigation in TBI across a variety of topics by many investigators including mechanism of neuronal death, oxidative and nitrative stress, proteomics, adenosine, serotonin, novel magnetic resonance imaging application, inflicted childhood neurotrauma, and TBI rehabilitation is addressed. Research discussed in the program of  cardiopulmonary  arrest  includes  optimization  of  the  use  of  mild  hypothermia  and  novel  investigation  in  experimental asphyxial cardiac arrest. In the program on hemorrhagic shock, our recent work on the application of mild hypothermia to prolong the «golden hour» is presented. Finally, a brief overview of our studies of a novel approach to the resuscitation of exsanguination  cardiac  arrest  using  emergency  preservation  for  resuscitation  (EPR)  is  provided. 

Об авторах

P. M. Kochanek
Department of Critical Care Medicine University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA


H. Bayir
Department of Critical Care Medicine University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA


R. P. Berger
Department of Pediatrics Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA


C. E. Dixon
Department of Neurological Surgery University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA


L. Jenkins
Department of Neurological Surgery University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA


A. E. Kline
Department of Neurological Surgery University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA


S. Tisherman
Departments of Surgery and Critical Care Medicine University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA


A. K. Wagner
Department of Neurological Surgery University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA


R. S.B. Clark
Department of Critical Care Medicine University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA


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Для цитирования:


Kochanek P.M., Bayir H., Berger R.P., Dixon C.E., Jenkins L., Kline A.E., Tisherman S., Wagner A.K., Clark R.S. The Safar Center for Resuscitation Research: Searching for Breakthroughs in the New Millennium. Общая реаниматология. 2006;2(6):15-25. https://doi.org/10.15360/1813-9779-2006-6-15-25

For citation:


Kochanek P.M., Bayir H., Berger R.P., Dixon C.E., Jenkins L., Kline A.E., Tisherman S., Wagner A.K., Clark R.S. The Safar Center for Resuscitation Research: Searching for Breakthroughs in the New Millennium. General Reanimatology. 2006;2(6):15-25. https://doi.org/10.15360/1813-9779-2006-6-15-25

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ISSN 1813-9779 (Print)
ISSN 2411-7110 (Online)